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% unemployment, a banking system that we thought was the pride of america that's now insolvent. the pride of the world in fact that's not basically insolvent except it was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. your reaching or five minutes, mr. madrick. [laughter] >> retail sales even recently kept going down so we are in trouble here. well what would you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. it wasn't capitalism, it wasn't on guided capitalism. it was government that told the berlin and investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities that did not understand. it was government that told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it is government that old people and all of these new mortgage brokers sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand that even when you can't understand them because he will make a lot of money and i can go on and on. >> you can't go on and on. >> i could go on and on a
sean: tonight, bill clinton, and two hostages released from north korea. but what did america gives up? >> the most effective means of protecting american safety. sean: eric holder. $9 million in the lawyer's fees. that is a whole lot in ethics violations. >> i formally announce my candidacy for the united states presidency. sean: an investigation into the latest golden boy of the political machine. frank luntz, and much much more. "hannity" starts right now. and this is a fox news alert. the two journalists detained in north korea have been released. laura ling and euna lee were released by north korean dictator kim jong il. the pardon was announced just hours after former president bill clinton arrived in p'yongyang. the journalists are both employees of the cable television station current, which is owned by former vice president al gore, and they were charged with illegally entering north korea and sentenced to 12 years of hard labor for their crime, but now, the ordeal is over, and the journalists are on routed back to the u.s. aboard president clinton's airplane. -- they are e
is trying to change america but maybe not the change you bar gained for. jon voight will be here to tell us why he has become so involved and he will give us his take on healthcare reform. >>> and they are one of the top christian music bands in the world. but recording platinum albums and selling out concerts not their only job. they are also youth counselors who try to keep youth on the right path. they perform one of their biggest hits here on the show tonight. >>> well, this weekend, funeral services were held for senator ted kennedy and with his burial the end of a long and storied senate career. though there were many controversies over the issues in his personal life, he was true to his personal political convictions. he didn't try to reinvent himself with each election or poll and proudly proclaimed himself a liberal when most ran from the label. i respect people honest their own political leanings far from those that change with the season. no one can accuse ted ken day of campaigning differently than he served or he believed. you can work with a principled liberal more effectively
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
of america, that is now insolvent. the pride of the world, in fact. it's not basically insolvent. except was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. you're reaching your five minutes. >> retail sales, even recently, kept going down. so we're in some trouble here. what will you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. that it wasn't capitalism. it wasn't unguided capitalism. it was government that did it. it was government that told those brilliant investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities they did not understand. it was government who told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it was government that told people, and all these new mortgage brokers, sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand them, even when you can't understand them. because you'll make a lot of money on it. and i can go on and on, as you all know. >> no, you can't go on and on. you're using up your five minutes. >> you
. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy asked that question and joins us live. was there any explanation by the congresswoman by what happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about her using the phone. what appeared to be happening was her staff was telling her that there were local political leaders coming to the meeting that he -- that she should talk to. greta: did she pick up the phone in the middle of your question? do you know who she was
wanted some legitimacy for their country. america has always said they would only talk to them in six- partyç talks, including our allies. kim jong-il got what he wanted, a former american president. as much as the white house and secretary of state say that there was no quid quo pro, and that president clinton was there on a private mission, -- it may have been a humanitarian issue, but even u.s. officials are telling us that he was given a briefing by cia and others before his visit. he was briefed on the latest with what they were doing, and there is no doubt duringç that three and a half hours with kim jong il, the issue must have come up. jon: is it possible that they held these meetings and did not discuss these issues? >> look at who met bill clinton. the deputy foreign minister who has been in charge of nuclear negotiations. he was very prominent. also, the north koreans, they broktwittered about this visit. they did not give much detail, just saying that president clinton came. the administration is trying their best to decoupled this visit from the nuclear issue. when yo
says president obama is trying to change america, but maybe not the change you bargained for. outspoken conservative actor jon voight will be here to tell us why he's become so involved and he'll give us his take on health care reform. and they're one of the top christian music bands in the world, but recording platinum albums and selling out concerts not their only job. they're also youth counselors who try to keep teenagers on the right path. grammy award winning casting crowns purchase one of their biggest hits here on the show tonight. well, this weekend, funeral services were held for senator ted kennedy and with his burial, the end of a long and storied senate career. though there were many controversy over the issues in his personnel life, he was true to his personnal political convictions, he didn't try to reinvent himself with each owe lex or poll and proudly proclaimed himself a liberal when most ran from the label. i respect people who are honest in their own political leanings far more than those who change with the season. no one can accuse ted kennedy of campaigning differ
are proud and happy that bank of america actually has a solution to help them out with their cards. i listen. that's the first thing i do is listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? and everyone's situation is different. we always want to make sure that we're doing what's best for our cardholders. i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you, aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from. that's what motivates us everyday. >>> the safe return of journalists euna lee and laura ling, former vice president gore this morning said laura's mother had some soup waiting for her. like any family meal, it's the family part that counts the most. for laura, it's her mother, father, husband, and sister, fellow journalist, lisa ling. >> proud would be an understatement. the lit
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
years from now an "america this morning" stamp. >> hard to believe but i hope so. >> you can get the latest business news any time at our website, abcnews.com. >>> coming up next on this wednesday, a major criminal investigation. did the host of a tv crime show order murders to boost his ra ratings? >>> a new message from one of the american women brought home from north korea one week ago today. >>> welcome back. these are the latest headlines from abc news. >>> president obama is trying to regain the momentum in the health care debate by using town hall meetings to press his case. >>> familyembers have gathered at the kennedy come pond in h n hyannisport, mass to remember eunice kennedy shriver. >>> frank dipascali, former cfo for bernard madoff has pleaded guilty and is being held as a flightrying. >>> allegedly commissioning five murders in an effort to boost his ratings. wallace souza not only the host he's a state lawmaker but authorities say his show's cameras suspiciously been at drug trafficker's murder scenes before police knew about them. he's also accused of his own
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
no, i have them. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. >> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [ applause ] >>> i'm supposed to be out here right now? i'm not governor mike huckabee. i'm not george w. bush either. but i would like to welcome you to, what is that guy's name? huckabee. ladies and gentlemen, mike huckabee, the governor. bring it on! [ applause ] >> hey, frank. >> hello, how are you? >> i'm doing great. so, we have you on the show today. >> yes, i will be here. >> which means we have dozens of people on the show today, right? >> that's absolutely, correct. >> give us a little preview. >> maybe a little bit of this. >> what were you thinking? very odd, very weird and let's get going. i want to see jon voigt. >> frank cal dougiendo on the w today. look forward to seeing you in a few minutes, frank. >> also, tonight, he says president obama is trying to change america
,000 in america? >> studying in the united states on different campuses, yes. >> rose: is there a... tell me how you're emphasizing education. >> education, we have a policy that's actually a national strategy. that is to develop countries through education with science and technology. so this is the idea of fundmental policy of china. so that's why the government has put so much emphasis on education. the government has increased its input in... that is to say has increased the government expenses for education. it's taking a larger share in terms of the budget of the country. and also vis-a-vis the g.d.p. >> rose: when you look at the united states, what is it about the united states and its growth and development to its position in the world today that you say we want to emulate that. we want to copy that. we want to be as good as they are at that. >> yeah, i think what the reform and opening up is demanding is that we need to learn from others, whatever that is good for china. so i think that's what we are... we have been trying to do since the beginning of the reform program in 1978. so tha
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
more bureaucrats, to control more of america through politicians. that is a fundamentally different world. we believe we ought to develop american energy and american technology so america is able to keep the money at home, both for national security and for economic growth. they believe you ought to raise taxes massively on american energy, cripple the american economy and make sure you are dependent forever on countries like venezuela and saudi arabia, a fundamentally different model. we believe you ought to develop green technology. i wrote "contract with europe," but we also recognize there are 240 million vehicles in the current fleet that will require current technology fuels for the next generation. they believe we ought to make a magic switch overnight to technology that does not yet exist at a price we cannot imagine using things we don't know about from companies that have not yet been formed fundamentally. [ applause ] >> we believe the world is dangerous, borders ought to be controlled, homeland security ought to work and security ought to defend america and americans an
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
of house senators say they will vote. coming this fall, tour the home to america's highest court, "the supreme court." >> two journalist are right tom today. they were accompanied by president bill clinton who helped secure their release. they were for -- that were from al gore's current tv network. >> welcome home laura ling and euna lee. [applause] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] >> 30 an hour seco -- 38 hours ago, euna lee and i were prisoners in north korea. we appeared at any moment that we could be sent to a hard labor camp. and then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting. we were taken to a location and when we walked in -- through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. we were shocked. but we knew instantly in our hearts that the nightmare of our life was finally coming to an end, and now we stand here and on and free -- home and free. euna and i would like to express our deepest gratitude to president clinton and his wonderful, amazing, not to mention supercool team, including john but as the -- podesta and the un
, especially when four of the five top-selling cars, though mostly assembled in america, are japanese. what does the white house have to say about all those hondas and toyotas? >> that the big three are doing well enough, accounting for 43% of sales. many honda and toyota vehicles are manufactured in the united states. but once upon a time there was language in the cash for clunkers legislation that would have barred any discounts for cars manufactured outside of the united states, meaning employing no u.s. workers or cars made in canada or mexico. the white house approval of that language was' moved because it would have00 head-long into free trade agreements and stopping the program cold. but the white house says this about overall domestic auto production and sales -- >> the statistics denote that the big three automakers have been represented well in this program because they're building cars that americans want to buy. >> and for that reason the white house wants the program to continue. shepard: so e.r.a. reid says the senate will vote this week. are republicans trying to stop it? >>
into a motion picture from warner brothers. its subject is america after an electromagnetic pulse attack. thank you again for being here. good to see you. >> thank you. >> i'm afraid there are many people waveng who perhaps don't know what an electromagnetic pulse attack would be. maybe we'd start with your explaining that attack. >> it's a byproduct of any detonation of any nuclear weapon. first realizing some testing in the '60s and before we go any further, i know this sounds like sci-fi. so you in the audience, folks watching this later -- if this sounds like sci-fi, this evening go on the internet, google up emp, go to wikipedia. here's a couple of other things you should look up. starfish crime which was the american test in 1962 of detonating a weapon in space which blew out a fair part of the power grid in hawaii. also look up soviet test 184. and then finally if you want to look at a completely different aspect of emp look up the carrington event which was actually triggered by a solar storm. and to go back to answering your question, emp, electromagnetic pulse, is a byproduct of deton
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
of america's top enemies in afghanistan and pakistan. first, it is a "360" exclusive. in her first interview since her sister's return, lisa ling tonight joining us on "360" to talk about what's happened since her sister laura and her colleague, euna lee, came home from north korea. how they're re-adjusting and how euna's 4-year-old daughter hana is doing now that mommy is finally home. former president bill children securing their release. he spoke publicly about that trip for the first time today. but frankly, said very little. >> i wanted those young women to be able to come home. and i wanted our two countries to have the ability to decide where to go from here. it would be wrong for me to say any more. the young women can speak for themselves about their experiences. the pictures were worth a million words yesterday. i'm glad i could be of some help. >> pictures which seemed to capture the heart of a nation. since then, both families have been out of the public eye. tonight, though, lisa ling has been kind enough to give us a window into the moments since that plane touched down and som
health care system in america, including the so-called government option, which we believe would lead to a government takeover of the health care system in america. >> supporters warn that the status quo means too much control by insurance companies. >> congress and the president will remove the insurance industry from coming between the patient and his or her doctor. >> would americans rather have the government or insurance companies make difficult health care decisions? they're divided. democrats prefer government, republicans prefer insurance companies. should health care decisions be made by government or by insurance companies? a lot of people hear that question and wonder, yikes. those are the choices? lou? >> yikes. another poll out today from quinnipiac, bill, also showing a dramatic shift on the handling of the president's health care proposals, from just a month ago. 42% disapproved. now 52% disapprove. that's a dramatic change. what's driving it, bill? >> it certainly is dramatic change. and it could reflect an increasing volume of criticism. though, i should point out tha
>>> good morning, america. and this morning, stunning, new video of the gym shooter. "gma" uncovers another video of george sodini. this time, at a controversial dating seminar. what does it tell us about the killer? >>> the new swine flu rules. the government releases new guidelines, suggesting three shots this year. but is it safe? >>> a sister's celebration. lisa ling tells us how her sister is coping after months in captivity. and what really happened in north korea. >>> and a triple-play in the park. three of the biggest stars from "american idol" perform live in three of the biggest stars from "american idol" perform live in our summer concert series. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, everyone. alongside chris cuomo, i'm robin roberts. diane is off, on this friday, august 7th. and we continue to learn more about the man who opened fire on an aerobics class earlier this week. >> we have a team of reporters looking into this. insight into him will help going forward. and this is a relationship class. a tough-love tutorial, with him participating. >> this, as t
negotiations with the americas. >> right. >> clinton comes over and the north koreans say we have had exhaustive talks. what they are saying is we got our one-on-one. >> you take everything that the north koreans say at face value? how naive. >> why would you disbelieve it? [ all talking at once ] >> hold on, please. >> any one of the americans sent over to, in a sense, escort them back would have put ourselves subject to that. i don't see any problem with it. >> you are failing to relinquish. >> i'm sorry. >> i want to remind you or you remind me, did the north koreans detonate a nuclear bomb in may? >> they have done so twice most recently in may. kim jong-il chose bill clinton because he gave away the nuclear sword to him in 1994 and allowed him to acquire the nuclear weapons. >> i'm sorry. >> kim was cheating on us before that was -- >> we can't let that stand unchallenged. >> jimmy carter -- [ all talking at once ] >> that can't stand unchallenged. president clinton didn't negotiate a framework when george w. bush came in. colin powell wanted to continue that. the bush administr
the roman empire ruled the world and means america stands anew as the greatest nation on earth. we will fix our problems and come back stronger than most people believe. pax americana boasts the most vibrant economy, and most innovative mind and best form of government so long as it stays out of business and wealth creation. america is exceptional, the one true leader of our planet. frankly, guys, i'm tired of president obama hat in hand apologizing for it to the rest of the world. pitch to the u.s. economy, will you? as a huge rocket ship on the launchpad, countdown has just ended. we have ignition, plumes of smoke are rising and the massive thing is starting to shoulder and shake, and liftoff is about to begin. if you believe in pax amer can narcs america the kickass, you have hope to believe this economy will be far more robust than everyone expects. and darren brooks, a big believe in pax americana. he runs the think tank that encourages individual action. amen. are we in the era of pax americana? >> i think for the last 200 years we have been in the era, this is the greatest nation on
questions. they may not be representative of america, but they are significant, and their views have to be taken into account. >> how are we supposed to trust you? i know that is a tough question, but i will make it easy. is there an option to say no to this bill? because it does not seem like you have said anything today. >> it is really not about health-care reform or about insurance reform. it is about government control. >> senator cardin, authority not given to you as a senator. greta: houston, texas, the congresswoman holds a town hall and actually answers herself on as a cancer survivor asks her a question. -- answers to cell phone as a cancer survivor after a question. -- answers her cell phone as a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> seriously. really, i mean, come on. >> you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy miller asked that question, and she joins us. tracy, that video looks absolutely horrible. was there any explanation by the congressman about why that happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about using the phone. her staff or hey
best hope: restoring conservatism and america's promise." i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you didn't bring me again. i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. i take her everywhere i go. she sells books. >> rose: the best ball girl we've ever had. she was good. and, boy, does she add to your show. >> oh, many i god. yeah. people always ask why mika went on the bookstore with me. she doubles the sales. and triples the size of the audience. i'm not dumb! it's like i've got any own palin nobody's there to see the old guy. they're there to see mika. >> rose: and the chemistry between the two of you. >> yeah. >> rose: good for you. let me just talk about you first. first the news. i watched your show this morning as i often watch your show. the clinton story. questions? what'd you think? why didn't he speak? he wanted to report back to the white house first? what? >> yeah, i think so. and i think it was a smart move for him. i'm confounded by some people on the right actually criticizing this operation. this is very simple. >> rose: it's
shepard: we saw some really emotional moments today when the journalists arrived back in america after spending four months in north korean custody. we thought we would show you a few of those moments starting with lisa ling's observation that just 30 hours earlier, she and euna were prisoners. >> we feared that at any moment, we could be sent to a hard labor camp. and then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting . we were taken to a location and when we walked through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. shepard: ling says when they saw him, they immediately knew their north korean nightmare was ending. >> to our loved ones, friends, colleagues, and to the complete strangers with the kindest of hearts who showed us so much love and sent us so many positive thoughts and energy, we thank you. we could feel your love all the way in north korea. it is what kept us going in the darkest of hours. it is what sustained our faith that we would come home. >> it speaks well of our country that when two american citizens are in harm's way, that so many
is the unitestates. we have 2000 now studying in china. >> we havebout 90,000. >> rose:ou have 90,0 in america? >> studying inhe united states on different campuses, yes. >> rose: is tre a...ell me how you're emphasizing education. >> education, we have a poli that's actuall a national strategy. that is to develop countrie through ecation with scien and technology. so ts is the idea of fundmental picy of china. so that's why the government has put much emphasis on education. the government hasincreased its inpu in... that is t say has increased the government expenses for education. it's taking a larger share in terms of the budget ofhe country. and also vis-a-vis the.d.p. >> rose: when you look at t united states, what is it about the united states andts growt d development to its positi in the world today that yousay we want tomulate that. we want to copy that. weant to beas good as they are at that. >> yeah, i think wt the form and opening up iemanding is that we ne to learn om others, whater that is good for china. so i thinkhat's what we are. we have be trying to do since the beginning o
of the minds i think on some additional regulation. not a global regulator. the united states of america should never agree to have an international regulator that tells it what to do and what not to do with its economy. but there are some things, i think, that looks now like they're going to come out of this meeting. some saw a regulation of tax haven is a healthy thing. that would be a healthy thing globally. some regulation, perhaps, of hedge funds and things like that. so i think we'll probably see that, and i think the obama administration will be going along with that. >> what about the core financial issue, which is what to do about these banks? you wrote an article in the financial times in which you basically remembered the experience of japan's last decade when you were in high government office, and you pointed out that the key problem was they didn't deal with the bad banks fast enough and decisively enough. they kept some of these zombie banks alive, well enough not to die but not well enough to actually give loans. it does seem like there may be so
, to america. how would you feel after you get it? two people who just got the vaccine yesterday are joining us next. steve: he cannot stay out of the spotlight. disgraced illinois governor blagojevich channeling elvis. >> ♪ kiss me once. (announcer) this is nine generations of the world's most revered luxury sedan. this is a history of over 50,000 crash-tested cars... this is the world record for longevity and endurance. and one of the most technologically advanced automobiles on the planet. this is the 9th generation e-class. this is mercedes-benz. ♪ bicycle, what are we waiting for? the flowers are blooming. the air is sweet. and zyrtec® starts... relieving my allergies... 2 hours faster than claritin®. my worst symptoms feel better, indoors and outdoors. with zyrtec®, the fastest... 24-hour allergy medicine, i promise not to wait as long to go for our ride. zyrtec® works fast, so i can love the air™. >> [1brian: nancy pelosi calling average americans to show up at the town hall meetings un- american. the white house tells senators, if you get it, we will punch back twice as hard.
leading the charge -- the president of the autism society of america. they have been listening to families about these issues and trying to come up with recommendations. i am sure that group would love to have an audience and get some ideas that they have been grappling with. >> you just wrote about standards. someone mentioned that you get all kinds of misinformation. you have been on this telehealth for three years now. when you mention standards, is that what you're talking about? >> absolutely. when we start our treatment program, it is a comprehensive treatment program. unfortunately, families can pop up in the internet search and tiepin -- type in telehealth treatment. i do not see how it is possible to form a true therapeutic bond and go ahead and treat the child. is very disconcerting. you can quarry pretty much anything with autism and related disorders. whether it is some way to repair your car, somebody who can paint your house, it is so sporadic. parents do not have a consistent place to ensure that they're going to receive quality care. i am encouraged that you have folks meet
. this is about a healthcare system that is breaking america's families. breaking america's businesses, and breaking america's economy. >> well, joining us now from washington is senator demint. author of the book, saving freedom. all right. senator. now, i want to look forward, rather than -- you know, we obviously know that you and president obama differ on how to provide good health care to the american people. well, now, that the obama administration is sinking in the polls and people are turning against the government-run health care to the tune of a trillion dollars, where does it go from here? do you expect to vote on this in the fall? >> we'll probably have a vote on it, but i think we're going to find out during september exactly what the american people think. actually during the august period when we're home on break. i have never seen americans more angry and more concerned about the direction of our country. they see this health care bill as part of a process that began with this massive stimulus and these other things that have -- taken over general motors. and people are
or every industry across the country. the government has to be in there to keep corporate america honest? the steel industry, for example? you pick one and name one. the american people are saying we want health care reform. the republicans are saying we want health care reform, but we don't want a government takeover. we don't want socialized medicine and national health care. >> those words are frightening to a lot of people. let me ask you this about a moderate forum, what congressman cooper just mentioned. what do you think of a co-op? >> well, chris, i'm not sure we know what that co-op is. kent conrad has talked about it. all the machinations going on in the senate finance committee, it's all been kept close to the vest. i don't think the american people really know what this co-op would look like. i want to look at it closely. and certainly i will take -- just like senator shelby said on sunday, let's take a look at it and let's make sure. i think anything is better than this government option that's in there competing with an unfair advantage on an unequal playing field. >> let m
this company has seen. they're based in montreal, operations all over north america. it's a paper and wood company. highly cyclical. less worse than expect results, one of the top five performers in the russell 2,000 right now. the stock's up 23% today, up 60% since earnings season started a month ago and the company is saying they're having lower input costs and better cost controls. that is helping things out. dom tar, the former dominican tar and chemical with a big, big rally today. yeah, it's down but up from the bottom. back to you. >> thank you, matthew. franklin mutual advisors ringing the closing bell today in honor of the 60th anniversary of their mutual series groups, one of the oldest mutual funds out there. the group an's flagship here it, mutual funds outperform the s&p up nearly 26% over that period. joining me chairman and ceo of franklin mutual advisors peter langerman. more importantly, what was the last -- the first mutual funds came out in the 1930s. >> we were one of the first and i think the interesting thing for us, we are our 60th industry and basically doing the sa
. >>> congress heads home to face america divided over health care changes. to discuss the policy and political divides with two key senators. john cornyn of texas, dick durbin of illinois. >>> and the big gap between the president's approval rating and his handling of the big issues. we take america's pulse with two top polls. >>> and the recession puts a squeeze on many community support organizations just when struggling parents and hungry children need the help most. the state of the union report for sunday, august 9th. >>> president obama heads to mexico tonight for a summit with the leaders of mexico and canada, a reminder of the mounting international pressures even as he struggles to sell his top domestic priority health care here at home. >>> greater cooperation fighting mexico's deadly drug world. and elsewhere on the stage, afghanistan, iran, and north korea all present the white house with difficult policy choices. the full and often frustrating list for the president and for his ambassador to the united nations susan rice. welcome. >> good to be with you. >> let's start with iran,
of clean energy. the department of the interior manages 20% of america. these lands that only include some of our treasured landscapes, but also some of the most productive energy areas. until recently, energy production of focus has been on conventional resources including oil, gas, and coal. insuring these resources is essential to our energy security, but we also have undeveloped potential on our public lands and under the leadership of president obama and secretary salazar, we are pursuing these opportunities. the bureau of land management has identified over 20 million acres of public land with energy potential and over 29 million acres with solar energy potential. there are also 140 million acres of public land in alaska with a geothermal resource potential as well as significant biomass potential. these public lands have the potential to produce a total of 2.9 megawatts of solar. 206 megawatts of wind. 39,000 megawatts of geothermal energy. there is also significant potential in our offshore waters. the department of energy, the national laboratory has identified more than 1000 giga
of dollars paid for in part by the pharmaceutical industry represent the kind of change america can believe in." david axlerod's son works there. steve: exactly. here's the thing about it. the $24 million to buy the ads, that is being bankrolled by the pharmaceutical industry. $24 million from the pharmaceutical industry, pumping into our tv and radio bloodstream and what not, and stuff like that. now, wait just a minute. didn't the pharmaceutical industry strike a backdoor deal with the obama administration regarding health care? oh, yeah. that's why a lot of people are going, hmm. however, the white house deny that axlerod is making any money on it. brian: did you see what bernie goldberg said last night? i thought it was a great point. remember everyone said -- critics. bush administration said, what is dick cheney doing? did he start that work so he could get his halliburton company, they used to be an executive, get all of those contracts to help rebuild iraq? people kept saying halliburton, look at dick cheney. maybe people thought halliburton was the best and only company that would
africa and the operations of hezbollah. we had experts here in the audience dealing with latin america. the question is, what are the iranians doing? what is hezbollah doing in that area? and in connection with the iranian involvement, and we do have our record of almost 30 years, it seems to me that we have to ponder the future with great concern particularly when we see the continuity of the ahmadinejad regime in iran today. so again, the bottom line of the question of threats and response depends on the perception of the threat and the coming of around at that i think we have to develop in order to reduce the risk of terrorism. so unfortunately from the academic point of view and a practical point of view, we would have to deal with this issue in the coming months as well as the coming years. i like to thank this opportunity -- take this opportunity to thank our panelist for this discussion. at this point, i would also like to recognize the interns who have worked with us this summer, who are finishing the work tomorrow. would you all please rise? where are the interns? this is the
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